Parkinson's Disease : About

Do you have Parkinson's Disease?

Parkinson's Disease is a slowly progressive disorder of the brain which can cause tremor, rigidity, difficulty walking, imbalance and "slowing down".  Many other things can cause similar symptoms, so it is important to first speak with your Primary Care Physician about your concerns.

Who we are and what we do:

 Dr. Georgia Lea is a specialty-trained neurologist in the field of Movement Disorders.  The majority of the patients she sees have Parkinson's Disease.  She works in close corroboration with Dr. Roger Smith of Neurosurgery in the identification, surgery and management of patients undergoing Deep Brain Stimulation therapy.

Lynn Eckhardt, GNP, heads the APDA (American Parkinson's Disease Association) Referral Center as well as manages the patients who undergo Deep Brain Stimulation therapy both pre-operatively as well as after the surgery.

Alicia Porter, RN is the Movement Disorders and DBS Program Coordinator.

Dr. Jayaraman Rao treated most of the patients living with Parkinson's Disease in the New Orleans area for the past 30 years.  He has trained hundreds of Neurology residents and many Movement Disorder Fellows.  He retired from clinical practice in 2010, but continues to speak, advocate for and participates in Parkinson's Disease research.

 

Treatment options:

 While there is still no cure for Parkinson's Disease, management by a Parkinson's Disease Specialist often results in many years of good quality of life.  Levodopa remains the most effective medication available for the symptoms of PD.  It can be found in the medications Sinemet, Parcopa and Stalevo (among others).  However, because chronic use of levodopa can lead to a different kind of abnormal movement called "dyskinesia", many Neurologists try to limit this medication as much as possible.  Depending on the symptoms of the patient and their other health problems, many other kinds of medications may be used.  The most commonly used group besides levodopa are the "dopamine agonists" including ropinerole (Requip) and pramipexole (Mirapex).

Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) therapy is an accepted adjunct to medical therapy.  It is not a cure for Parkinson's Disease, nor does it replace medications, but it can significantly improve the symptoms of PD in the appropriate patients.  Neurosurgeons across the world are learning how to place the fine wire into the deep brain, but  many do not work in close corraboration with a Parkinson's Disease Specialist.  The involvement of the specialized Neurologist in all steps of the procedure greatly effects the success of the surgery.  At Ochsner, only patients who have been seen and evaluated by a Parkinson's Disease Specialist (Neurologist) and deemed appropriate candidates are referred for surgery.  The Neurologist is then present during the surgery for critical intra-operative testing.  And, after surgery, the patient is followed closely in the Neurology Department for programming of the generator and optimizing medications.

Local News

Dr. Rao on Hello Health, May 11, 2009.  Stem Cells and Parkinson's Disease

Dr. Rao in April, 2009 issue of Louisiana Medical News

Dr. Lea on WDSU channel 6.  

 

 

 

Other Movement Disorders